News

Battle River Power Coop Scholarships

Annually Battle River Power Coop makes four scholarships of $1000 available for dependents of Battle River Power Coop members. Applicants must be entering their first year of post-secondary study in either a diploma or degree-granting program and be a high school graduate of the current or previous school year. Application requirements include proof of registration in the program of studies and a letter of reference from the current school principal, teacher, guidance counselor, or apprentice coordinator. Also required is a letter from the applicant outlining the reason for selecting the program of studies, an overview of the applicant’s involvement in their local community and the reason for the need for financial assistance. A committee of the Board of Directors reviews applications and successful applicants are confirmed in the early part of 2018. The deadline for 2018 applications is December 1, 2017. For complete information on the scholarship criteria and to access an application…

Electricity - The Cooperative Way

A cooperative is an organization owned by the members who use its services. Historically, people have used coops as a means of accessing goods or services otherwise unavailable to them. Today’s coops continue to provide member/owners with everything from farm supplies to groceries to financial services to electricity. Many have grown into strong, competitive businesses while remaining rooted in the seven cooperative principles that make them distinct and member oriented. Battle River Power Coop is just such a cooperative. There is an Annual General Meeting where members democratically vote for the Directors of their Board – Directors who live and work in the communities the Coop serves. Their focus is to serve and protect the interests of the Coop and its members. Battle River Power Coop does not generate profits for stockholders. We leave savings in members’ hands - a total of $5.9M in 2016. We work cooperatively with the communities we serve, leveraging activities like vegetation…

Why Rural Electrification Associations are Coops

All Rural Electrification Associations (REAs) in Alberta, including Battle River Power Coop, are Cooperatives. In the time before electrification, REAs were one of three options for power delivery to Alberta farms. The Alberta Power Commission proposed that the assets of corporate investor-owned utilities (IOUs) be combined to create a provincial, publicly owned utility. The IOUs were not in favor of this. They were also not keen on the second option, that IOUs should install the infrastructure and provide rural Alberta with power. The result was that rural farmers were encouraged to form REAs following the Rural Electric Cooperative model successfully operating in the rural United States. The plan, or third option, was that small rural cooperatives would raise money and install the poles and wires to power their farms. Afterwards, REAs would rely on corporate power companies for maintenance, service and billing. After much debate, the Alberta Government turned the decision over to the…

Electrician Services

Did you know that Battle River Power Coop members may access electrician services through the Cooperative? The service was added in response to member requests and is available at a reasonable rate for all your electrical needs, large or small.  Services include: Wiring of shops, garages, warehouses, barns, outbuildings, and basements General maintenance in houses or other buildings Lightning protection Yard light installation Install or disconnect secondary poles Set up temporary service Install splitter box Underground connections Upgrade electrical panels Grain dryer connections Install surge protector in breaker panel Load test, consumption issues and assessments Battle River Power Coop does electricity from start to finish. Services include planning and engineering, installation of new services, maintenance, vegetation management, office administration and billing. Convenient and high quality electrician service is an additional benefit of membership in the Cooperative. The next…

Coops Build a Better World

The theme of Coop Week, from October 15-21, is Cooperatives Build a Better World. A cooperative is a farm, business, or other organization that is owned jointly by its members, who share the benefits and economies of scale that membership brings. Cooperation is an age-old concept that historically and in the present day teaches people to take control of their own financial lives. There are examples all over the world of individuals and whole communities who have improved their economic well-being through cooperation. A short history lesson is helpful in understanding how this works. Back in nineteenth century England, the Rochdale Society of Equitable Pioneers was founded with the simple goal of accessing decent food at reasonable cost and true weights and measures. They pooled their resources, worked together and opened a store where owners and customers were one and the same. The Pioneers learned about business and finances, sold good quality food at reasonable prices and weighed it…

Prevent Fire during Harvest

The theme of Fire Prevention Week, October 8 to 14, is Every Second Counts. This is true for any fire, but especially meaningful in farm fields where ideal harvest conditions are also ideal fire conditions. It can take as little as a hot exhaust pipe or a spark from metal against rock to ignite a tinder-dry field, where the nearest fire department may be miles away. Limit the risk of fire by checking bearings and drives for appropriate lubrication and tension. Stop during the day and take a walk around your machinery. Look, listen and smell for signs of trouble and remove accumulations of chaff and dust near heat sources. Some farmers even insist that only vehicles essential to the harvest are allowed on crop land. ATVs and trucks are parked at the edge of the field. It is well worth the time to have a look at the Alberta Agriculture’s information page Fire Extinguishers on the Farm. There is specific advice about the type and size of fire extinguishers for combines, tractors, balers…

Safe Limits of Approach and Clearance

Electricity always tries to move toward the ground through the easiest path. If you touch or even come too close to an overhead line with an auger, combine, elevated truck box or other equipment, there is potential for electricity to travel through the equipment, or through you, to the ground. The distance that you must maintain between your equipment and the powerline is regulated by the Alberta Electrical Utility Code in two different ways. Safe Limit of Approach means the distance that you and your equipment must maintain while doing work near powerlines. The distance is a minimum of seven meters (23 feet) unless otherwise confirmed by the powerline owner. This limit applies to active work like loading or unloading trucks, using ladders, operating augers, cranes, booms or any other machinery. If your work plan involves people and equipment in closer proximity than seven meters Battle River Power Coop powerlines you must contact the office. The Operations Department will evaluate your…

Help Battle River Power Coop Grow - Refer a New Member

Battle River Power Coop members have advantages with the Cooperative as their power provider: Members save money on Distribution Tariff compared to Investor Owned Utilities. In 2016, members saved an average of $738. Members experience consistent savings. The total average member savings over the last 10 years is $6,864. Battle River Power Coop provides personalized service. Your call is answered by a real person 24/7/365. Battle River Power Coop provides electrical service start to finish. Planning and engineering, new installations, maintenance, service, vegetation management and billing are all managed under one roof. Battle River Power Coop is committed to cooperative principles and provides efficient, cost-effective, reliable electricity to our member-owners. With no outside stockholders receiving dividends, the savings coops generate is money that stays in members’ hands and in their rural communities. You can support your coop’s growth, and introduce prospective new members…

Call before You Dig

Whether installing fence posts or putting in a septic tank, members need to connect to Battle River Power Coop. Knowing where your primary and secondary utility lines are located will avoid personal injury and expensive repairs. Click Before You Dig has become a well-known catchphrase for anyone planning any ground disturbance in Alberta. Their website www.clickbeforeyoudig.com  will forward you to Alberta One-Call, a not-for-profit corporation providing a communication service between people who intend to disturb the ground in Alberta and the utility companies and/or operators who registered their buried facilities with Alberta One-Call. What is less known, but critically important, is the fact that privately owned underground facilities are not registered with Alberta One-Call. For Battle River Power Coop members, this means the secondary lines past the meter and privately installed lines between buildings are not on Alberta One-Call maps. To arrange for locates of these lines, Battle…